Removing AMP for WP with 301 Redirects for Google Before Disabling the Plugin

Would you like to learn how to deactivate the AMP for WordPress or other accelerated mobile page plugins because this will be useful to avoid potential problems with search engines?

Removing AMP for WP with 301 Redirects for Google Before Disabling the Plugin

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Removing AMP for WP with 301 Redirects for Google Before Disabling the Plugin

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You can take the full course named “My WordPress Course for a Fast Ecommerce Website with Kinsta, Astra, WooCommerce, and LearnDash” at https://uthena.com/courses/wordpress-learndash.

Let’s see how to deactivate the AMP for WP or other accelerated mobile page plugins. It’s not as simple as just clicking “Deactivate” because if you just click “Deactivate” and your URLs are already indexed in Google search, you’re going to potentially have some errors and problems with your website and search engines.

Therefore, it’s important to follow the steps in this tutorial to successfully redirect all the URLs before you actually deactivate accelerated mobile pages.

If you are wondering, well why would I want to deactivate it?

It’s supposed to make my website faster.

Yes, it is supposed to make your website faster, but I’ve tested on my website and it is so optimized, it actually goes faster for mobile devices without the amp URL, and this is why you need to follow this procedure.

Removing AMP for WP with 301 Redirects for Google Before Disabling the Plugin

As you notice, the amp for WP plugin and other amp plugins create amp URLs, which are different from whatever the base URL is, and all these need to be redirected so that Google knows, “Oh, everybody should be going to this URL now and not that one.”

I used my web host Kinsta to make these redirections.

You can click on your domain and click on “Redirects.”

Removing AMP for WP with 301 Redirects for Google Before Disabling the Plugin

Then, you hit “Add a redirect rule.”

There are two different things you need to put in here.

First, this code needs to go on the source URL.

Removing AMP for WP with 301 Redirects for Google Before Disabling the Plugin

This tells my website to pick any URL that ends with amp, and that’s what I want to redirect.

Then this goes in the main field and that tells it to just redirect it to whatever the original URL was without amp.

Removing AMP for WP with 301 Redirects for Google Before Disabling the Plugin

That way, it essentially takes every URL that has amp and puts it back to the non-amp one, all in two steps.

You can also use a WordPress plugin for this called the “WordPress redirections” plugin.

If you just search WordPress for “redirection plugin” or you can do your own redirects, which if you’ve got a lot of pages on your website, I don’t recommend.

Thus, if you don’t use Kinsta or your web host hasn’t redirect set up, just go to the redirection plugin and you’ll see the same thing.

301 Redirects

Note that on the redirection plugin, you need to check Regex, which means this is a regular expression.

Now, Kinsta by default has this on, and there’s no option for Regex.

Once you’ve got it set up, it’ll look like this, it’ll redirect from the URL, and then redirect to, and it’ll have a domain.

301 Redirects

Now, this takes a minute, especially when I’ve got 800 and something pages on my website, so that means I don’t go to my website immediately to the /amp URL and expect that it has been immediately redirected. It takes a little while sometimes for this to take effect, and what I am seeing is that it is at least going to a desktop version of my website and not that amp plugin.

On that page, it successfully did what it’s supposed to. I went in and put /amp on the URL and it just took /amp off and sent me back to the “About” page, and that’s exactly what we wanted to do.

301 Redirects

Thus, it can take a minute to redirect all the URL sometimes, so just check it, eventually give it some time, and then go back and check your website.

I can just go on individual blog posts and type /amp and I can see that it’s working.

When I go on these individual blog posts, I just type in /amp and it’s removing amp from the URL, and that’s good.

That means Google search now knows all of these URLs are not amp and it’s working correctly.

So, I typed that /amp and it is removing all the URLs, which is excellent.

That’s how you know you’ve done it successfully and at once you’ve done that, then you’re ready to actually go in and deactivate the plugin because once the plugins is deleted, now it will remove the tag that tells Google that those are amp URLs.

Once you can confirm the URLs are being redirected, then you can deactivate the plugin and delete it.

You can continue learning with us in the full class today “My WordPress Course for a Fast Ecommerce Website with Kinsta, Astra, WooCommerce, and LearnDash” at https://uthena.com/courses/wordpress-learndash

You may like to read this post: Google AMP Test – How Much Do Accelerated Mobile Pages Matter in Search and Discovery

I love you.

You’re awesome.

I hope this has been helpful.

Love,
Jerry Banfield

Edits from video transcript by Michel Gerard at www.michelgerardonline.com.